On Sabbath

I have just finished my first class for my Doctor of Ministry degree. I am part of the first class that’s in the hybrid model, and because of the COVID, we met entirely online this week. It was four hours of Zoom, with an hour of Zoom for chapel. I am Zoomed out. I am screened out! I need a break.

Fridays are my intentional days off, and I usually have this rhythm: get up early as normal, and do the regular routine until 8:30. Then–read. Do laundry. Go for a walk. Write. Prep DND games. Avoid screens until evening. Have a relaxed evening with Brian. Be prepared for whatever Saturday may bring.

I work hard to take a day off. I have struggled previously, to the detriment of myself and my ministry, in not checking e-mail, not answering calls (but checking voicemail if it is an emergency), not participating in life online because these boundaries have helped me emerge on Sundays (usually Saturdays, this job has weird hours) more refreshed, more refilled, more (God forbid!) rested.

I’ll be taking tomorrow off as much as I can. I waver on how much church work can be done on days off–sometimes, an e-mail must be replied to (with a simple “OK, let’s run with it,” even); sometimes, a text gets through. I hate to think the entire day is toast. If I spend two hours (timed) going over my sermons for tomorrow, is that work, or being present and purposeful and ready, knowing I’ll have two hours on Sunday to recoup?

Sometime I’ll write about resting in advance. Not the best practice, folks! But that day is not today. Today, I want to power down this computer and have a sustained break from Zoom, typing, this monitor and my study.